UCP SmartBrief

Assistive Technology——————

Software helps children with disabilities communicate
Invention Labs has created a picture-based software application called Avaz to help children with cerebral palsy and other developmental disorders communicate. Company founder Ajit Narayanan said the software converts muscle movement into speech using pictures, so a user could put together the words “I like,” then choose a picture of an apple. The Economic Times (India) (1/24)

Ohio district uses technology to remove learning barriers
Some educators in a school district in Ohio praise technologies, such as laptops and tablets, for helping to eliminate learning barriers and increase motivation for students with disabilities. “Any time you can see the kids be more independent and more involved with their peers, you know (the technology) is doing its job,” said Rita Woeste, the district’s technology-integration specialist who taught special education for 29 years. The Advocate (Newark, Ohio) (tiered subscription model) (1/26)

Disability Update——————

Panel recommends ways to improve voting experience
A bipartisan commission urged election officials to give more attention to people with disabilities, expand online registration and allow more early voting to help solve problems of long lines and other difficulties that were seen during the 2012 election. The panel said polling places should have checklists to ensure accessibility and poll workers should be trained on how to help voters with special needs. Disability Scoop (1/24)

Transitions——————

Students learn academic, social skills in greeting-card business
Teachers at a high school in Kansas are using a greeting-card business to teach students with disabilities academic and social skills. While making the cards, students follow verbal and written directions, read work orders, handle money and learn to work as a team, special-education teacher Matt DeMoss said. “My goal while they were in high school, just like any other teacher, was to get them ready for that post-secondary career,” he said. The Joplin Globe (Mo.) (1/23)

N.Y. district transitions to career-focused diploma option
Students with disabilities in the Lansing Central School District in New York who do not earn a traditional high-school diploma now have the option to earn career development and occupational skills credentials. The new path takes the place of the “IEP diploma,” which was available to some students with disabilities in the district until last July. “We’re now focusing more on students leaving our schools work-ready,” Kathy Rourke, director of special education, said. Ithaca Times (N.Y.) (1/25)

UCP News——————-

National call on disabilities treaty, Tuesday
Tuesday, Jan. 28, at 1 p.m. EST, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Community Leadership team will hold a call to develop a national strategy to allow for continued negotiations on the disability treaty. The CRPD was inspired by U.S. leadership in recognizing the rights of people with disabilities, and would provide a vital framework for creating legislation and policies around the world that embrace the rights and dignity of all people with disabilities. RSVP for the call and contact your senators by visiting www.disabilitytreaty.org.

Register now to attend the 2014 Disability Policy Seminar
Early registration is now open for this year’s Disability Policy Seminar in Washington, D.C., April 7 to 9. This event is the biggest and best opportunity for advocates to advance the grassroots movement for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and is hosted by UCP, The Arc, AUCD, AAIDD, NACDD and SABE. Register now and book your room at the Grand Hyatt in downtown Washington D.C. for a special early registration rate by visiting www.disabilitypolicyseminar.org. But act soon — the special room rates end March 4.

Ending on a “high-quote”:

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.”
— C.S. Lewis
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s