Physical Therapy Month

pediatrictherapyIn honor of National Physical Therapy Month (yay October!), we want to do a fun/informative post.

10 signs that you’re a Pediatric Physical Therapist

10- You are used to answering the question, “What?? Why do kids need physical therapy?” after someone asks what you do.
9- You get excited to wear fun socks to work because let’s face it, you barely wear your shoes at work anyway.
8- No matter how your hair is styled for the day, by the end of the day, your hair will be tied back in a pony tail.
7- You have your standard 5 nursery rhyme songs you know by heart and can sing all day long.
6- You have at least 1 toy rolling around in your car.
5- You’re a pro at walking in a squatting position and walking backwards down stairs.
4- You are able to use 1 toy for a minimum of 5 different activities.
3- You know how to sign for “more” and “all done.” (you probably just read this again and did the sign with your hands )
2– You’ve developed cat-like reflexes to dodge flying toys and to catch falling children.
andddd last but not least!
1- You still get excited every time one of your patients reaches a new milestone

–Lisa Kerfoot, Physical Therapist, DPT, Manager of Therapy Services

 

Make sure to tell our physical therapists how much you love and appreciate them! You can leave a comment on the blog and they will see it.

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World CP Day, Child of the Month: October 2013

October 2013: Wyatt

With World CP Day being this past Wednesday, October 2nd we thought it would be fun to feature a very special boy with CP again and give you a bit of an update on what the therapists at UCP-OC are currently working on to make sure he lives a Life Without Limits!   

On World CP Day:

Please join us as we recognize and celebrate the many families and children we serve with cerebral palsy! As United Cerebral Palsy of Orange County, World CP Day is a wonderful opportunity for us to share our appreciation for your support of our organization.  We are honored to serve children with any developmental disability while we pride ourselves on our expertise in treating children with Cerebral Palsy.

We hope this day will lead to many more opportunities to acknowledge and support our families throughout the community that have children with many different disabilities.

We know World CP Day was Wednesday, but here is how you can get involved still:

  1. Post your idea to change the world for people with cerebral palsy!The best ideas will be given to inventors, to turn dreams into reality at www.worldcpchallenge.org
  2. Like our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and even YouTube Channel!
  3. Share this story with a friend or on your Facebook.

On Wyatt Review & Update:

Five years ago, we noticed our sweet 6 month-old son missing developmental milestones, and we began to search frantically for a cause. Our answer was clear, yet one we struggled to accept. Our son, Wyatt, was diagnosed with hypotonic cerebral palsy.

It is estimated that over 600,000 children and adults in the U.S. manifest one or more of the symptoms of CP. Currently 8,000 babies and infants are diagnosed with the condition each year.

Cerebral palsy (CP) is damage to the brain, occurring during fetal development; before, during or shortly following birth; or during infancy, that affects the overall muscular skeletal system. CP is characterized by an inability to fully control motor function, particularly muscle control and coordination.

For Wyatt this presents itself in very low muscle tone resulting in difficulties balancing and holding himself up; and in his speech, gross and fine motor skills.

Daily life is fatiguing for our son.

With his diagnosis looming over us we were worried. Would he be able to go to school and have the same opportunities as any child? My wife Jemi and I discovered the search for services is multifaceted and complex. After three years of Wyatt receiving therapy at many different therapy offices, we found UCP-OC and were able to breathe a sigh of relief. His care is no longer fragmented and Wyatt receives all the services he needs in one place.

United Cerebral Palsy of Orange County (UCP-OC) is a place with clinical and social support; a place that could answer our family’s questions; a place that feels like home. All therapies are play based to encourage a fun and motivating atmosphere.

Wyatt_TireswingPhysical Therapy: Wyatt receives physical therapy that is helping him to walk confidently on his own, go up and down steps and keep up with his peers. His physical therapist, Cori, has Wyatt ride swings for vestibular stimulation and to work on core strength. On the tire swing he strengthens his core and lower extremities by leaning over to pick up toys on the floor.

Occupational Therapy: OT helps Wyatt with his play and fine motor skills, such as holding a crayon to color and dealing with changing social environments so he can experience his peers to their fullest and to make friends.

Speech Therapy: Wyatt no longer receives speech and language therapy, however many children with CP have difficulties with their speech. Therapists work on strengthening speech articulators (tongue, lip and cheek muscles) as well as breath support to help facilitate speech. Many of the children practice their speech skills with the help of an iPad.

Today Wyatt attends school and participates in the classroom with his friends. He feels like everyone around him, and as a parent that is all we can ask for. We have new hopes and dreams for Wyatt, and we are seeing these become a reality with the help of UCP of Orange County. Wyatt has a bright future of more growth!

Sincerely,

Jemileth & Mark Dipko

Proud Parents of Wyatt