A Mother’s Reflection on UCP-OC

In a class assignment, one of our parents was asked to describe how parents of children “go through” the stages of grief. After sharing her heartfelt and emotional answer on how she views UCP-OC, we were left speechless and eager to share with our families. We hope you enjoy it and can connect with her feelings. Please leave a comment to share with Adriana!

 I have four daughters. My two oldest have ADHD and my youngest child was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy. Reading each stage reminded me of the day that I was told of my youngest having Cerebral Palsy. For me it didn’t feel like stages were the best word to describe the emotions it was more like waves. When the doctor first told me it felt like I was standing on the beach seeing this giant tsunami coming right towards me. I looked to the side and saw my three oldest Alyna daughters playing in the sand with their dad making sand castles. I have my baby in my arms and start to run as fast as I can away from the tsunami (shock, denial).  I run towards my family, I saw a little canoe with some life jackets and yell at them to get the jackets on…the same time praying that the wave doesn’t kill us.(fear, anxiety) The wave hit and knocked me down and I couldn’t breath.(depressed, stressed, guilt, hopelessness) I felt like I was drowning, I was kicking and trying to swim to keep my head above water. I had no more strength to keep swimming and I couldn’t breathe. Right before I start to sink God sends a lifeguard. The life guard puts you on his lifeboat and takes you back to shore, talks to you,  gives you techniques you will need, and shows you where to find some answers. You look up and see your baby’s face. It looks like the sun setting on the beach; that moment when the sun hits the water and it’s the most beautiful sight ever. You know that you are going to have to face the ocean of waves again but this time you do research and use all the resource available such as therapy for the baby, support group for the family, online classes etc. You turn around and there it is again, the Tsunami building strength, but the difference is you don’t have a canoe or life jackets, instead you build a submarine. You help your family in and right before you shut the lid to this steel, strong submarine you look straight at the wave and think BRING IT!

 

                                                        –Written By Adriana, mother of Alyna

Please click here to find out how you can make an impact on children like Alyna and mothers like Adriana!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s